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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
less for you. big thunderstorm complex diving down towards michigan. get ready in detroit. 6:00 to 7:00 a.m. in detroit. rain and thunderstorms heading your way. unsettled in new england. look at the middle of the country. this is as hot as it gets for this time of year. >> summertime still in effect. thank you, bill. >>> concerns over syria push stocks below the 15,000 mark and could cause gas prices to rise. >>> plus, a measles outbreak is causing major concerns. you're watching "first look" on msnbc. if you're seeing spots before your eyes, it's time for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] aveeno® with soy helps reduce the look of brown spots in 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results. aveeno®. nascar is ab.out excitement but tracking all the action and hearing everything from our marketing partners, the media and millions of fans on social media can be a challenge. that's why we partnered with hp to build the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and sto
people may not know his speech originated in part in detroit. explain what dr. king was saying two months before. guest: yes, i'm from detroit and i grew up there. with aretha franklin's father and many other prominent ministers in detroit. dr.king participated in a huge march in detroit leading down near cobal hall where he delivered a similar speech and he talked about using our resources to make sure justice will be delivered. he talked about some of the same things he did in washington. he also talked about obviously detroit being the headquarters of a tremendous labor movement with u.a.w. the local focus in terms of negro rights was extraordinarily powerful. so dr. king founded some of those things but of course took them to a new level in washington. host: from june of 1963 two months before the march on washington. this is put together from motown records. >> i have a dream this afternoon. my four little children will not come up in the same young days that i came up. they will be judged on the basis of the content of their character and not the color of their skin. i have a dre
tonight in detroit. tigers slugger miguel cabrera may have been impressed with oakland's hitting in the series. the a's jumped on detroit starter doug fister in the second. curt sushgszuki puts the a's up two nothing, his first start since joining the league last weekend and pitching for the first time since april 29th. brett anderson pitched the final inning allowing runs. oakland pounded out 21 hits inclouding two home runs from brandon moss. his three-run shot in the 8th puts oakland up 14 to 1. moss had a career high six rbi, and the a's win 14 to 4. >>> pablo sandoval giving hunter pence a quick sal sa dancing lesson. looking good. including buster posey to end the 6th. tied at one when the rockies played four runs, two on former giant ground rule double. colorado would hang onto win 5 to 4. >>> it is time for your wednesday night top five. mets andrew brown pops up to phillies catcher. nobody is covering third. eric young, jr., tags up and moves up for the stolen base. >>> at no. 4, atlanta center fielder b. j. up ton with the 9th diving catch to rob cleveland's carlos sant
for detroit. 20 10 air cargo threat as well as other plots that were effectively mitigated. some more international in scope and origin like the christmas they plot was involved a nigerian citizen who purchased his ticket in ghama,. flew from legos to amsterdam and attended to ignite a bomb en route to america. that attempted attack, we learned that relevant information possessed by u.s. customs and border protection needed to be available overseas at the last point of departure for the united states. we fixed that. we learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am
-free municipal bond, but does detroit give you cause for concern? and other cities across the country that are in similar condition? >> well, i wouldn't touch the cities. you've got to do your homework. so, cities, whether it is harrisburg or detroit or stockton, california, they're are a number of cities you've got to get under the hood and look at the credits but if you look at the highest grade, quality tax-free bond today, they're out there with the yields between 4 and 5% and they're not city credits. they're not detroit's. when that analysis is done, at our present tax structure the taxable equivalent yield is about nine. where are you going to get nine in a liquid investment of very high credit quality? i don't see very much of it. so we shifted allocation to tax-free bond. ashley: very good. do your homework. always good advice. david kotok, thank you so much for joining us. we appreciate it. >> thank you. lori: let's take a specific look at the market because the gains thus far are evaporating slightly. lauren simonetti joins us from the floor of the stock exchange. you're wa
is focusing on detroit. a city that is gone through incredible pain. and this is an opportunity for those of us who believe this is the greatest country in the world for people to have the opportunity to become all that they can be. we can go to detroit and it's a city where we which party has run that city for the past 50 years and we can propose different solutions, solutions . sed on our free enterprise strongly encouraging enterprise zones in detroit but we need ideas. anyone want to talk to us about detroit, that's where we think is one of the most important places to have an impact and to share in the cause that each of us believe. it's an honor to be with you all to share some words. i appreciate the opportunity. and god bless you. god bless america. thank you. >> thank you. now we will hear from mr. bob woodson sr., founder and president for the center of america.integrated >> good afternoon. the dr. king i remember was a man who was not content with reflecting the majority opinion or the consensus of the majority but he challenged it. we forget that the civil rights movement was
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
elements. if you look at his speeches from birmingham, wrik wrigly field, cleveland, chicago, detroit, i have a dream and the march on washington is really a culminationef a series of interracial fest valz that summer in which all the elements, many from letters from a birmingham jail-- are reshuffled. when you see the continuities of "i have a dream" even the drea dream-- and king always believed before there was an american dream-- he used to preach this all the time it's slaves had their own dreams. and keep in mind here, doesn't end with the declaration. it's a black man. black slaefs have the last word when he has whites become blacks so we can all experience bondage and deliverance. always conflicted when you look at king's brilliant mixing to miss these other strains of black pride and rebeaut of america. one day, the national will live out, not now. >> rose: clawrns, how did he end up being the last speaker? >> there was a proposal, 10 speers, and each speaker would be allocated five minute. and the proposal was dr. king would be in the middle, that he would be like the fifth or
government must step in to ensure the state and local government. the problem detroit faced is that -- >> state, local, and tribal government. >> and tribal government. [laughter] >> okay. >> the problem with detroit, unlike many municipalities that depend on revenue from real estate tax, they run on income taxes. they never recovered from 2001. the black unemployment rate never recovered from 2001. that downturn decimated the revenue stream for the city, and it never came back. if there are banks that are too big to fail, and we have to step in to make sure they function, there are cities that are too big to fail. [applause] >> bankruptcy in one of those cities. >> yes, and so it is not enough for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, droit. no. we said to wall street, $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. behind you, what are the policies? >> so, wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax because when they gamble, we lose. [applause] they have to pay
't have to look any more at greece and portugal. we can look close by at detroit . folks, that is a picture of where liberal progressive ideas go. detroit was america's premier city. highest per capita income in the country. proud of our country and the auto business there. but then as you had government unions grow and higher taxes, and more regulation, as you saw these liberal progressive ideas that were supposed to help the poor and build a middle class, what have we been left with in detroit? for minorities and the poor? unemployment, about 40%. has it helped children get a better education? only 7% of children in the eighth grade read at the grade level. has it created the prosperity that they talk about when a third of the buildings are empty, where you've got 400ly quor stores and until a few weeks ago not one chain super market in what was america's premier city. folks, it's not a theatrical argument any more. and the states of california and illinois and other states following that policy are not far behind in some form of bankruptcy. our ideas are being show cas
you think martin luther king would be saying about what has unfolded in detroit? >> well, i think obviously he would be very concerned. he would be outraged today that in america, black youth unemployment is close to 40% and real unemployment in this country is 14%. he talked about and led and moved toward that march on washington, that poor people's march at the time that he died, what he was talking about is an economy of full employment. massive investment in job creation and not just for african-americans. he was bringing together hispanics, poor whites and he was saying we have got to stand together and too often, ed, we forget about that aspect about martin luther king jr. and we simply focus on his enormously effective work in desegregating america. >> that day, what was the mood like? if you have to capture the emotion and memory about what that day was like, what would you say? >> enormous optimism, enormous excitement about the fact that so many people of all colors, of all ages came together in washington, d.c. that was unprecedented up until that point. the king speech
at that. oh, my god. >> that jungle cat is terrorizing residents in this neighborhood in detroit. >> like they don't have enough issues in detroit. >> it's unclear what breed it is or if it is a ferile cat. oh, that is scary. something gray -- gray and black marks and kids in the neighborhood say they are scared. >> i'm going to run, for one. i be scared to walk the neighborhood because it come out on you. it's not scared. >> it ran to me, so i ran. i ran in the house. it was real scary. i said i never going back there again. >> it looks like a cat with really long legs. >> yeah, large cat. >> studies show there are thousands of stray cats roaming detroit. the michigan humane society promises now to investigate. >> you know what works, moth balls. detroit really is reverting to its natural state, you know what i mean? wild animals roaming eating the population. >>> let's check in with janice dean with a look at the weather. >> i haven't spotted any stray cats around here. >> just large rats, new york. >> wow, those can be scary. absolutely. >> more rats than there are people. >> this big
to four with six rbis. that will be three straight wins over detroit and they have activated brett and promoted fellow starter. he will pitch of the bullpen for now although the days are short on starters. the giants and colorado tied at monfort ending with highlights coming up at a clock. the dodgers outfielder may be the hottest thing going but that did not stop its own manager from managing him today and his game against the cubs. then in the fourth pemex slat flashy snatched catches. he makes the catches but i'm not sure what the problem man's spirit? he was replaced what skip schumacher. schumacher gave him the best chance to win and i guess it worked and a bit and the mcdougals and 1. >> reporter: >> and hopefully if everything still on as planned i will turn professional after my sophomore year but i have everything in to john on fulfilling my degree year. >> reporter: the ninth time world champion his cause is quite a stir on cal campus. not on a freshman course the stars thursday she has not declared her major. she is one golden to team events in the olympic spirit and fin
in detroit to stand with those to make a difference in what was happening in the south. >> so you drove from detroit with your mom, came down here. what was this like? 50 years ago, when this mall was filled with, you were one of a quarter of a million americans. >> actually we took the greyhound bus. it was a wonderful experience. it was a very, very hot humid day but it was so incredible to see so many people fro all walks of life all standing together in unity after havg heard so many disturbances. buthere was no fr that there would be anything happening because everyone shared the same goal. >> well, it's 50 years later. it's your birthday again and now you came from detroit, drove from detroit, with your granddaughte granddaughters, why. >> i drove because i wanted my granddaughters to have the experience that i had 50 years ago. so they'll have the same kind of hope that i have for what we're facing in today's associate. >> what are your thoughts about this? you have seen the videos. you have talked to your grandmother. what are you looking forward to today? >> i'm looking forward to s
and extracted that phrase and first used it in the detroit speech and then the speech in washington. >> i think one of the things to remember about dr. king, he was always operating on multiple levels in the context of the speech. he had just visited the university of virginia, only about three months before the march on washington 15 years ago where he was given a very academic speech and really spoke from the professor voice and academic voice about philosophy. remember, the university of virginia is mr. jefferson's university. it is the president, the founder who wrote that bad check, who wrote of course that extraordinary founding document that said we take it as self evident that all people are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights and if if there was any self evidence on the mountain in 1776 than the fundamental human equality and so we see in king drawing on his ak sem i can self and a moment of african-american american woman dom preacher dom and the great historic document. >> we talk about the historic speeches and you can see tens of thousands get
mother understood that we lived in the north in detroit michigan, where i live now. she and i knew, from reading different obligations, like jet , about newspaper different disturbances in the south. remember seeing the picture of major adverse, after he had been killed -- medger evers after he had been killed. i went to integrated schools and lived in a integrated neighborhood. my friends were white and black, all through school. it disturbs my mother and me that people in the south had problems and could not live the life that i lived. they went to lunch counters and took public transportation. we would get on the bus. ride wherever we need to go and sat wherever we want to set. -- sit. coming to the march meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. just my mother and i. 250,000 people felt the same way. many who watched from their tvs and homes. it felt the same way and could not get there. thatew and understood america is a democracy and they're supposed to be freedom. there is not freedom. we have to unite and stand together as a child, i was 12 .ears old you c
for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, detroit. no. we said to wall street $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. mark -- [inaudible] that's behind you. what would be some of those policies? >> so wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax, because when they -- [applause] we lose. and they have to pay for cleaning up the whole mess. not just their mess, not just the mess that let them get their jobs back, get their bonuses back and then argue for a tax cut after they got their bonuses and we saved their bankrupt companies. if we saved aig that was bankrupt, we can save detroit that's bankrupt. and if aig who caused the downturn in the first place could get a bonus because it stated in their contract they had to get a bonus, then detroit city workers can get a pension just hike it said in their contract. [applause] .. which of course makes the united states different and unique from other countries in the world supporting the immigrants now no other country even comes close. but
since obama has been in office. detroit, youention hear about the vagrancy, they put on the labor unions and the government there and so forth. is a placeriver called windsor, candidates, where ford motor company have a major plant. that plan does not have to pay for the medical benefits for the workers. that is why ford is very successful. you've got to look at everything within that aim. just general motors did not know what they were doing. motors the general pushing brooms making $100 an hour. i tell you what, funny one of those jobs, and i will give you 20% of my pay every week. thank you very much. host: the next call independent line. valerie, you are on the "washington journal." caller: good morning. benjamin should quit listening to the liars on msnbc. what i really called to see as i do not see how there will ever be a copper mines when you have one side that look believes in big government and one -- and more spending and one side that leaves in smaller government and less spending. i do not see how there can never be a copper mine. -- a compromise. they are two totally differ
people have strong 04. you cannot rob people in detroit of their pensions. if we stand by while they take their pensions, they will take our pensions. don't think it will happen -- will happen to us. they will do it again. inequality is a skirt on our society. and -- a scourge on our society. and yes, we're talking about $7 an hour workers and we got to do something about it, but on this side of it, some people are doing pretty good. between 1979 and 2007, a time frame of all of a less than 20 years, real income went up by the 240% for those in the top 1%. it is a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. we've got to fight back. our economy is capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we cannot do it while we are getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas. they just leaned on us a few months ago for this south. deal that they said would create jobs. the -- this south korea deal that they said would create jobs. it has already cost jobs. i'm not against trade. but these are not really trade deals, but i
've got to say, you cannot rob the people of detroit of the pension. they worked hard for these pensions. and let me tell you something, if we stand by what they take the detroit pension they will be taking our pensions. so don't think it will happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they will do it to us again. let me just tell you this. inequality is a scourge on our society. and yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour. we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979-2007, a period, although less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1%. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we've got to fight back at this. let me tell you, our economy is capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy could do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas, that just leaned on us a few months ago for the south korea the other said it will c
is in detroit. caller: i am currently a student at wayne state university. the question is is college worth the cost. it is not i feel worth the cost. we are facing a situation where i -- i may not be able to pay for classes in the fall. even over an academic issue, but over the content -- contract i have with housing. i might be kicked out of school this semester. >> you have a conflict with what? >> with the housing right now. >> is that because it is too expensive or there are too many people in the housing unit? >> just filed for bankruptcy, detroit. they are trying to increase my tuition. housing is too much. foricole, thank you calling in and sharing your story. this was the subject of an article earlier this week, and they pulled him out about student loans. "more students rely than ever on federal student loans aid. "more students rely than ever on federal student loans aid. she covered today's speech by president obama and we spoke to her earlier earlier in the afternoon for her thoughts. what new ground did the calls forbreak in lowering college costs? >> this is a more expansive
to discussions in the black study center. paul kuntzler was born in detroit, michigan, in 1941 and raised at grosse pointe there before moving to washington, d.c. in 1951, he was active with the michigan young democrats and the congress on racial he called it. he credits john f. kinney as a major influence on his political consciousness. iin december 19 city with a move to washington, d.c. just days before his 20th birthday. he attended both the northern virginia center of the university of virginia and george mason university. for 32 years he was on the senior staff of the national science speakers association as assistant executive director for advertising exhibits an exhibitor workshops. in 1962, he was elected to the board of directors of the society of washington, the districts first gay-rights group. on april 17, 1965, he was one of 10 people in the world's first gay-rights picket in front of the white house. he is also one of the founders of the gay and lesbian activists alliance. he has an incredible memory are displayed by his tendency to recall events not just by the day but dow
to take place. >> juan, go ahead and respond to wayne there. weologist know, detroit, 41% poverty rate and st. louis 21%. the ten most dangerous cities in the country have the highest, most elevated poverty numbers in the country. >> yeah, poverty, unemployment, failure drops out from school and, guess what, a high percentage of minority. it hurts my heart. but, wayne, this is what you need. you need leadership that will come in and speak to kids who are not advancing and who are not making any progress and, instead, get involved with gang activity and with violence and this is how they can prove there is somebody in this world. that's a losing prescription. you have to believe in education. you have to believe in a job and building a resume. i don't think that this is a mystery if you want to make it in america. >> jonathan, there is -- >> even maybe a minimum wage job that would keep a young person out of trouble and focused on producing on the future. i mean, there's no question the gang has already pointed out. less likely to be this type of violent crime in a stronger economy. you
momentarily. i am from detroit. i lost my parents at an early age. brother.raise a i was able to go to school and i graduated out of high school at 16. i was able to get an associates degree. i found work at a hospital. our kids need be education. month.be 54 next i have been sick all my life. my family came from tennessee. they always fought. >> vivian, what stood out today? what speech or comment? >> what did you say? >> diane black, ok? i am black, ok? they did not want us to take welfare. they taught us to be independent. you calling ine and sharing your story. to facebook, you can see a lot of the video on facebook. here is a comment. w bush and george w. bush declined to participate because they have health issues. george w. bush did release a statement earlier today that read -- the statement from former president george w. bush, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from unive
on washington, d.c. at least two tour buss collided on their way to this event. they were coming from detroit and crashed. they were almost there. 7 to 8 people hurt. we are keeping an eye on it. >> we will get more information. >> this major story army major nadal hassan found guilty on all counts. he faces the death penalty for killing 13 people when he injured others. he said this on fox and friends. >> what was really relieving is it took four years to come to this point and when survivors are talking about this, we talked about the need for justice to be served and when we saw the verdict come down, it meant a whole lot to us. all 13 jurors must vote for excuse or he will get the rest of his life in prison. and an 8-year-old girl fights off a would-be kidnapper in her backyard. >> she bit down on the man's hand and she kicked him and when she broke free ran into the neighbor's side door. >> the kidnapping attempt caught on a neighbor's surveillance camera. >> authorities are warning families to be extra vigilant. >> it was monkey see monkey do. little girl making friends with this gorill
, the justice department, you can go on and on. it is like they want us to be detroit. we did not vote for him. he got no votes from this state. thank you, obama. e are paying for it. he does an in run around everybody. what can we do to get oklahomans working, to get these things implement it without them sitting up there and saying, this is what you are going to do. instead of the people that own this country telling them what to do. [applause] >> you know, i would tell you, do not blame it all on obama. they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i experienced them. he did, too. it goes back to the thing we started with. this government is on -- out of control. it has been predicted by historians our republic would fail. the question is, how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we re-embraced the things that made america great? as i said earlier, we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a big difference. i worked every day -- > we are going to leave this -- i'm convinced the only w
, the epa, the irs, the justice department to go on and on and on. it's like they want us to be detroit. we didn't vote for him. he got no votes from the state, thank you, oklahoma. but we are paying for it. and he doesn't end run around everybody. what can we do to get oklahomans working, to get these things implemented without him sitting up there and saying, this is what you're going to do, instead of the people that own this country telling them? [applause] >> you know, i would kill you don't blame it all on obama because they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i expense them, and he did, too. he goes back to the thing we kind of started out with, is the federal government is out of control. but it's been predicted by all the historians that our republic will fail. so the question is how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we really base -- we embrace the things that made america great. as i said earlier i think we have to get in charge. i've been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a bi big difference. b
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)